Seasons

by Ann de Bruyn

Richard Rawlings

Richard Rawlings

Born in 1962 I have been making photographs for 50 years. And bought my own SLR at the age of 14 this was a fully manual film camera. I lived and worked initially in the west country but relocated to East Anglia, close to the Cambridgeshire fens in 1983. I have been here since.

I love the fens there is a natural ebb and flow to them and, despite being turned over to arable farming, they have a peculiar natural beauty. It is nice to escape there. Over the past 18 months I have been afforded the opportunity to get to know my local area very well and this has been reflected in the image I have taken over this time. Just seeing the natural changes that have taken place.

richardrawlingsphotography.co.uk

It can often seem like one season blurs into another. The individual distinctness of each one has, over the years, fallen away. Winters become milder and summers become changeable. However, once you get away from the rat race of faster cars, even faster phones and the daily pressures of work, the countryside still recognises each season and changes can be clearly seen.

Seasons start and finish at given times of the year. The Met office works on March, April and May for Spring, June, July and August for Summer. September, October, and November for Autumn and finally December, January, and February for winter. Astronomically seasons are based around the equinox and solstice Spring starts 21st March, Summer 21st June, Autumn 21st September and Winter 21st December.

Autumn

No season tells us its arrived in quite the style of Autumn. The heady days of summer are still fresh in our minds. BBQ’s, late nights and early mornings and the long hot days, that, normally, mark summer. Suddenly its gone! It’s getting dark at 7.30pm and getting light later and the early morning stagger to look out of the window becomes a little easier with more sleep. The car is now covered with heavy dew and the grass now soaks the feet, training shoes are out and boots back in.

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