Jeff Freestone – Portrait of a Photographer

by Ann de Bruyn

Matt Payne

Matt Payne is a mountain climber, adventurer, and fine art nature and landscape photographer specialising in unique and hard-to-reach locations and subjects, including the highest mountains in Colorado. Matt has climbed the highest 100 mountains in Colorado which is where his love for landscape photography began. Matt produces a podcast dedicated to that love affair called F-Stop Collaborate and Listen Matt's goal for the podcast is to create a space to have meaningful conversations with other landscape photographers all over the world.Matt also follows a very strict code of ethics as a nature photographer. 

mattpaynephotography.com

Jeff Freestone Autumn Fall

Autumn Fall

The pursuit of nature and landscape photography can take on many forms and the paths we take can be about different things for different people. Some of us just like to escape the hustle and bustle of daily life, finding relief and mental comfort in the solitude and serenity that nature offers. Others prefer the thrill of the chase, looking to enjoy the rare endorphin high created by those fleeting but memorable moments while in the landscape. Some find joy in the monetary success that can be found, albeit rarely, from this pursuit. Others use photography as a vehicle through which they may find a greater purpose for themselves and discover a means of personal artistic expression. Jeff Freestone blends two of these motivations – relief from the noise of civilization and pursuit of self-discovery in a way that makes his work stand out in a very crowded field.

Others still use photography as a vehicle through which they find a greater purpose for themselves and discover a means of personal artistic expression.

Naturally, there are those of us that find joy in all of these paths and motivations to make photographs (and I’m sure we can find others); however, when I spend time examining and enjoying the photographs created by Jeff Freestone, I can’t help but see that he has found something special, something “more” gained through his relationship with craft and subject as amplified by his pure personal motivations.

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