INSTANTLY Improve Wildlife Photos with These 10 Pro Shooting Techniques (VIDEO)

by John Stapel

Whether you’re shooting at a local nature reserve, on safari in Africa, or photographing birds in your backyard, there are several things you can do to dramatically improve your results.

The episode below isn’t about the latest gear, but rather it reveals a variety of time-tested techniques that you can easily employ when shooting in the field. Landscape pro Steve Perry of Backcountry Gallery demonstrates 10 favorite tips that are often more important than expensive wiz-bag equipment.

As Perry explains, “While things like new gear and technology are nice, when it comes to creating truly great images, those considerations take a back seat to the kind of techniques you’ll discover in this video.” In just 13 minutes he shows how it’s done.

Perry’s suggestions concentrate on composition and artistic methods of wildlife photography, and he begins with the importance of “catching the catchlights.” This seemingly little detail, “that can make or break a photo,” involves properly rendering an animal’s eyes—especially if they’re black or very dark. By doing this right, you’ll bring life to your subject.

Another key consideration is the vantage point you choose; i.e. whether you shoot from above a subject, at eye level, or looking up from below. Perry also explains the different results you’ll achieve when shooting with the sun at your back, or using front light or side light to illuminate a subject.

Perry’s other helpful tips include paying particular attention to the background, avoiding secondary animals in the frame, occasionally getting in tight without worrying about capturing the entirety of an animπal, and much more. He also explains what he means by “always keep your eyes on the prize.”

There’s much more to learn about wildlife photography on Perry’s YouTube channel, so be sure and take a look.

And check out the tutorial we posted posed recently, explaining why another pro says zoom lenses have advantages over big, heavy primes for nature and wildlife photography.